10 7 / 2014

#HemlockGrove season 2 premiere 😁 whoo! #netflix #FamkeJanssen #BillSkarsgard #LandonLiboiron #MadelineBrewer #EliRoth  (at Arclight Cinemas Hollywood)

#HemlockGrove season 2 premiere 😁 whoo! #netflix #FamkeJanssen #BillSkarsgard #LandonLiboiron #MadelineBrewer #EliRoth (at Arclight Cinemas Hollywood)

27 6 / 2014

Brazilian dancers at the #CongaRoom last night. #BET #LatinCokeNight 💃 (at The Conga Room)

Brazilian dancers at the #CongaRoom last night. #BET #LatinCokeNight 💃 (at The Conga Room)

27 6 / 2014

Getting ready for the club last night 😆 thank you Jenny for the beautiful braids 😒

Getting ready for the club last night 😆 thank you Jenny for the beautiful braids 😒

26 6 / 2014

Whoo! #4DExperience ! 😁 so damn excited ! Thank you #AEG. You sure know how to keep your employees happy. #4DX #RegalCinema

Whoo! #4DExperience ! 😁 so damn excited ! Thank you #AEG. You sure know how to keep your employees happy. #4DX #RegalCinema

25 6 / 2014

#RedBandSociety 😁 free screening with Cesyboo. #fox  (at The Landmark)

#RedBandSociety 😁 free screening with Cesyboo. #fox (at The Landmark)

22 6 / 2014

poppylife:

I watched this documentary last night, and a full day later, I can’t stop thinking about it. I am haunted by it. 
I think for the first time in my life, I’m actually getting that life isn’t fair. It seems like a simple lesson, one that I should have learned long ago. But after watching this documentary, I have to admit that deep down inside me there’s a little girl who still likes to believe that justice is always served.
It is not.
And I think that’s what unsettled me the most. 
I watched the story of these five young men who had their lives and youth stolen from them. Where is the justice for them? 
The truth is, real life isn’t an episode of Law & Order. No one swoops in at the last minute with that vital piece of evidence to prove someones innocence. Instead these boys went to prison and had their lives altered forever. 
The beautiful thing is that these young men grew into adults who seem remarkably free of bitterness. 
Let me stop rambling long enough to tell you that this is a must watch. Definitely check it out…

poppylife:

I watched this documentary last night, and a full day later, I can’t stop thinking about it. I am haunted by it. 

I think for the first time in my life, I’m actually getting that life isn’t fair. It seems like a simple lesson, one that I should have learned long ago. But after watching this documentary, I have to admit that deep down inside me there’s a little girl who still likes to believe that justice is always served.

It is not.

And I think that’s what unsettled me the most. 

I watched the story of these five young men who had their lives and youth stolen from them. Where is the justice for them? 

The truth is, real life isn’t an episode of Law & Order. No one swoops in at the last minute with that vital piece of evidence to prove someones innocence. Instead these boys went to prison and had their lives altered forever. 

The beautiful thing is that these young men grew into adults who seem remarkably free of bitterness. 

Let me stop rambling long enough to tell you that this is a must watch. Definitely check it out…

22 6 / 2014

knowledgeisqueen:

the central park five tells the story of the five black and latino teenagers from harlem who were wrongly convicted of raping a white woman in new york city’s central park in 1989. the film chronicles the central park jogger case, for the first time from the perspective of these five teenagers whose lives were upended by this miscarriage of justice.” if you’re like me and you didn’t catch this documentary when it aired on pbs the other night, watch it here.

posted by @traemili

22 6 / 2014

piecesofablackman:

The Central Park Five.

These were five Black and Latino kids who are now adults, who were arrested in 1989, and later wrongfully convicted of the rape of a white woman in New York’s Central Park.  I saw a documentary about these brave individuals a few weeks that definitely moved me, and shows just how flawed the justice system is in America.  These kids who were in their mid teens at this time, spent between 6 to 12 years in prison for a crime they didn’t commit, and was  later confessed by a serial rapist, later having the conviction overturned. New York City owes these brothers for what they took away from them.

22 6 / 2014

nprfreshair:

The five men charged for the brutal beating and rape of a Central Park jogger in 1989 have been exonerated and will settle suit for $40 million.

Soon after they confessed in 1989, the boys recanted their statements saying the police pressured them to say they had committed the crime. All were convicted and served prison terms of up to 13 years. In 2002 a jailed serial rapist and murderer confessed to carrying out the crime, and his DNA matched the records. The “Central Park 5” brought a civil rights suit against the city of New York and are now settling for $40 million. 

If you want to learn more about the psychology of false confessions listen to our interview with Doug Starr. Starr went undercover and was trained in two different kinds of interrogation techniques. He explains why so many people confess to crimes they didn’t commit. 




Photo by James Estrin (Lawyers, in foreground, and the five defendants in the Central Park rape case of a female jogger waiting for the ruling in February 1990 in State Supreme Court in Manhattan.)

nprfreshair:

The five men charged for the brutal beating and rape of a Central Park jogger in 1989 have been exonerated and will settle suit for $40 million.

Soon after they confessed in 1989, the boys recanted their statements saying the police pressured them to say they had committed the crime. All were convicted and served prison terms of up to 13 years. In 2002 a jailed serial rapist and murderer confessed to carrying out the crime, and his DNA matched the records. The “Central Park 5” brought a civil rights suit against the city of New York and are now settling for $40 million. 

If you want to learn more about the psychology of false confessions listen to our interview with Doug Starr. Starr went undercover and was trained in two different kinds of interrogation techniques. He explains why so many people confess to crimes they didn’t commit. 

Photo by James Estrin (Lawyers, in foreground, and the five defendants in the Central Park rape case of a female jogger waiting for the ruling in February 1990 in State Supreme Court in Manhattan.)

22 6 / 2014

soulrevision:

[For more on social justice, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision and on Tumblr: soulrevision]

Antron McCray. Kevin Richardson. Yusef Salaam. Raymond Santana. Koery Wise. 

These are the names of the INNOCENT black and Latino men who spent 7-13 years in jail for a crime they didn’t, a crime they are still seeking justice for. Never Forget!

22 6 / 2014

midstorm:

― Karen Marie Moning, Darkfever

follower celebration | requested by wishingforalastingsummer

(via thehookerhatter)

22 6 / 2014

22 6 / 2014

"My only regret is that
I didn’t tell enough people
to fuck off."

My 92 year old grandma (via expeditum)

(Source: lule-bell, via the-absolute-funniest-posts)

22 6 / 2014

22 6 / 2014

(Source: peetasboner, via lolsofunny)